Military Aerospace Technology Today is: Oct 22, 2006
Volume: 5  Issue: 2
Published: Oct 08, 2006


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Boeing, Lockheed Martin Join JCA Competition

Boeing and Lockheed Martin have both entered into the fray for the U.S. Army and Air Force’s multibillion-dollar Joint Cargo Aircraft program. Lockheed Martin said it plans to offer its four-engine turboprop C-130J Hercules cargo aircraft for the competition. Boeing said it will join Global Military Aircraft Systems, a joint venture of L-3 Communications and Italy’s Alenia North America, in its bid to land the contract. Team JCA, a combination of EADS CASA North America and Raytheon, is also competing for the deal. The U.S. Army and Air Force have given companies until May 17 to respond to a request for proposals (RFP) for JCA. The services plan to issue a final contract award for the program in November 2006.

The Army and Air Force view JCA as a new fixed-wing transport aircraft capable of performing rapid-response intratheater missions with cargo, equipment and soldiers, as well as medevac duties and airdrop delivery. The new aircraft would replace the Army’s 43 Sherpa planes and ease the Air Force’s reliance on the C-130, its workhorse intratheater cargo plane. It would also expand the military’s ability to ferry cargo and troops to remote places because they would be able to land on runways of just 2,000 feet, opening access to more than 6,000 additional runways around the world.

The services issued a new RFP for the program in late March.

The Army was poised to release the final RFP for the then-Future Cargo Aircraft program this past year until the Air Force signaled its interest in purchasing a light cargo aircraft. Though aware of the Air Force’s interest in a similar capability, the Army still hoped it could go forward with FCA and address the Air Force’s needs at the Milestone C point in September 2006, according to Army officials. Instead, Pentagon acquisition chief Ken Krieg stopped the FCA RFP release and instructed the Army and Air Force to report back to him with their assessment on a possible joint program. FCA is one of several off-the-shelf aircraft purchases that are part of a comprehensive restructuring of Army aviation funded with the $14.6 billion saved by the cancellation of the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter.

Lockheed Martin has decided to enter the JCA competition because the company believes its C-130J capabilities align well with the program’s requirements, a company spokesman said. Team JCA plan to offer either the C-235, C-295 or a mixture of both for the competition. GMAS is offering the C-27J Spartan.

GMAS said Boeing’s experience and expertise in the airlift market is a welcomed addition to the team. “With the addition of the U.S. Air Force component to the JCA, the C-27J team realized the need to transition the production of the aircraft to the U.S. in order to accommodate a high volume production schedule,” said Bob Drewes, president and COO of L-3 IS Group. “Boeing brings the ability to establish a streamlined, process-based production facility in the U.S. that will ensure on-time delivery to the JCA customers.”

GMAS’s C-27J is an upgraded version of the Alenia G.222, which was developed by Lockheed Martin Alenia Tactical Transport Systems.

The C-27J can carry a maximum payload of 25,353 pounds and has a fuel capacity of 3,255 gallons. It has a maximum cruise speed of 325 knots true airspeed and a range of about 1,000 nautical miles when it is close to payload weight limit. At half its weight capacity, the aircraft has a range of about 2,300 nautical miles

The C-27J will use Rolls Royce AE 2100-D2 engines, which produce 4,637 shaft horsepower each. The CN-235 carries about 13,000 pounds of cargo, while the C-295, which is 10.2 feet longer, carries about 19,800 pounds. The CN-235 is also in production for the Coast Guard’s Deepwater System, which is designed to replace its aging ships and aircraft. The C-295 can carry 79 troops or 49 paratroopers, and has a maximum operating speed of 260 knots true airspeed. The C-295 also has a range of about 2,300 nautical miles while carrying about 10,000 pounds of payload. It has two Pratt & Whitney PW127G engines with each generating 2,645 shaft horsepower.

The C-130J Hercules can carry more than 42,000 pounds of cargo. It can accommodate 92 combat troops or 64 fully-equipped paratroopers on side-facing webbed seats. The aircraft is powered by four Rolls-Royce AE2100D3 turboprop engines.


Boeing, Lockheed Martin Join JCA Competition

Boeing and Lockheed Martin have both entered into the fray for the U.S. Army and Air Force’s multibillion-dollar Joint Cargo Aircraft program. Lockheed Martin said it plans to offer its four-engine turboprop C-130J Hercules cargo aircraft for the competition. Boeing said it will join Global Military Aircraft Systems, a joint venture of L-3 Communications and Italy’s Alenia North America, in its bid to land the contract. Team JCA, a combination of EADS CASA North America and Raytheon, is also competing for the deal. The U.S. Army and Air Force have given companies until May 17 to respond to a request for proposals (RFP) for JCA. The services plan to issue a final contract award for the program in November 2006.

The Army and Air Force view JCA as a new fixed-wing transport aircraft capable of performing rapid-response intratheater missions with cargo, equipment and soldiers, as well as medevac duties and airdrop delivery. The new aircraft would replace the Army’s 43 Sherpa planes and ease the Air Force’s reliance on the C-130, its workhorse intratheater cargo plane. It would also expand the military’s ability to ferry cargo and troops to remote places because they would be able to land on runways of just 2,000 feet, opening access to more than 6,000 additional runways around the world.

The services issued a new RFP for the program in late March.

The Army was poised to release the final RFP for the then-Future Cargo Aircraft program this past year until the Air Force signaled its interest in purchasing a light cargo aircraft. Though aware of the Air Force’s interest in a similar capability, the Army still hoped it could go forward with FCA and address the Air Force’s needs at the Milestone C point in September 2006, according to Army officials. Instead, Pentagon acquisition chief Ken Krieg stopped the FCA RFP release and instructed the Army and Air Force to report back to him with their assessment on a possible joint program. FCA is one of several off-the-shelf aircraft purchases that are part of a comprehensive restructuring of Army aviation funded with the $14.6 billion saved by the cancellation of the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter.

Lockheed Martin has decided to enter the JCA competition because the company believes its C-130J capabilities align well with the program’s requirements, a company spokesman said. Team JCA plan to offer either the C-235, C-295 or a mixture of both for the competition. GMAS is offering the C-27J Spartan.

GMAS said Boeing’s experience and expertise in the airlift market is a welcomed addition to the team. “With the addition of the U.S. Air Force component to the JCA, the C-27J team realized the need to transition the production of the aircraft to the U.S. in order to accommodate a high volume production schedule,” said Bob Drewes, president and COO of L-3 IS Group. “Boeing brings the ability to establish a streamlined, process-based production facility in the U.S. that will ensure on-time delivery to the JCA customers.”

GMAS’s C-27J is an upgraded version of the Alenia G.222, which was developed by Lockheed Martin Alenia Tactical Transport Systems.

The C-27J can carry a maximum payload of 25,353 pounds and has a fuel capacity of 3,255 gallons. It has a maximum cruise speed of 325 knots true airspeed and a range of about 1,000 nautical miles when it is close to payload weight limit. At half its weight capacity, the aircraft has a range of about 2,300 nautical miles

The C-27J will use Rolls Royce AE 2100-D2 engines, which produce 4,637 shaft horsepower each. The CN-235 carries about 13,000 pounds of cargo, while the C-295, which is 10.2 feet longer, carries about 19,800 pounds. The CN-235 is also in production for the Coast Guard’s Deepwater System, which is designed to replace its aging ships and aircraft. The C-295 can carry 79 troops or 49 paratroopers, and has a maximum operating speed of 260 knots true airspeed. The C-295 also has a range of about 2,300 nautical miles while carrying about 10,000 pounds of payload. It has two Pratt & Whitney PW127G engines with each generating 2,645 shaft horsepower.

The C-130J Hercules can carry more than 42,000 pounds of cargo. It can accommodate 92 combat troops or 64 fully-equipped paratroopers on side-facing webbed seats. The aircraft is powered by four Rolls-Royce AE2100D3 turboprop engines.



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